Relaxium Sleep Review

Are you one of the countless individuals seeking a sound and restorative night's sleep? If so, you've come to the right place. In this objective analysis, we will delve into the ins and outs of Relaxium Sleep, a supplement that aims to improve sleep quality and duration. We'll explore the science behind its ingredients and weigh its potential benefits against any drawbacks.

May 19, 2023

What Is Relaxium Sleep? 

Persistent sleep disturbances can manifest in various forms, such as difficulty initiating sleep, maintaining sleep, or awakening without experiencing residual fatigue and sluggishness. A significant number of individuals encounter one or multiple of these symptoms at different times, which may be intensified by stress, anxiety, and an array of medical and lifestyle factors.

Nonetheless, there are numerous strategies that can be employed to alleviate these issues. Modifying lifestyle factors can considerably impact sleep quality and duration. Additionally, incorporating certain supplements, such as Relaxium Sleep, can offer further support. These supplements are specifically formulated to facilitate a smoother transition into sleep and promote enhanced sleep quality throughout the night.

Do We Recommend Relaxium Sleep?

The main research behind Relaxium Sleep has some serious flaws and isn't robust. On top of that, many of the ingredients are not present in the right amounts to be clinically effective. However, the product performs adequately for some people.

With that said, we recommend NooCube Sleep Upgrade instead. It has a simple yet powerful mix of natural ingredients like magnesium, vitamin D3, and soothing plant extracts. These ingredients help your body naturally produce melatonin, and our own tests have shown it to yield better and more consistent results than Relaxium.

The ingredients in NooCube Sleep Upgrade are superior to those in Relaxium Sleep and it's a simpler, more effective natural formula. The key components in NooCube, such as magnesium, vitamin D3, and calming plant extracts, have a well-established role in promoting restful sleep. They work by enhancing the body's natural production of melatonin, the hormone responsible for sleep regulation.

Relaxium vs NooCube Sleep Upgrade Review

Dr. Eric Ciliberti

Relaxium Sleep is a sleep-enhancing supplement specifically designed to promote accelerated sleep initiation, maintain a deeper state of rest, and facilitate awakening with heightened alertness and freshness.

Relaxium Sleep claims to support more restorative rest and claims to offer consistent results.

The product has been extensively researched by Dr. Eric Ciliberti, a distinguished neurologist and sleep expert, but as we'll see, there are major problems with the research methodology. He designed the formula utilizing all-natural, non-habit-forming constituents that are entirely safe for consumption. These ingredients aim to foster tranquility, induce bodily relaxation, and enable the body's innate sleep cycles to operate more effectively.

Ciliberti's Claims

  • "All natural"
  • "Non-habit forming ingredients"
  • "Extensively researched"
  • "Supports the body's natural cycles"

Relaxium Sleep Claimed Benefits

Does Relaxium Sleep live up to the claims?

Relaxium Sleep Overview

The formulation of Relaxium Sleep consists of an amalgamation of diverse components, which have been demonstrated to facilitate sleep, promote relaxation, and contribute to the establishment of healthy sleep patterns. Although the supplement operates through several mechanisms, its primary function is to stimulate the production of melatonin.

Melatonin, a sleep-promoting hormone, aids in regulating cortisol levels, the hormone associated with stress and anxiety, and fosters deep, consistent sleep. By binding to the brain's receptors, melatonin diminishes nerve impulses and lowers dopamine levels, resulting in drowsiness, sleep initiation, and maintenance of a deeper sleep state.

In contrast, elevated dopamine levels contribute to wakefulness.

Clinical evidence supports the efficacy of melatonin, as it has been utilized in the treatment of primary sleep disorders and shown to expedite sleep onset considerably.

Relaxium Sleep features ingredients that complement this melatonin enhancement, such as ashwagandha and magnesium, which assist in reducing stress and anxiety levels. Magnesium contributes to extended sleep duration, thus augmenting melatonin's ability to facilitate sleep more effectively.

Ashwagandha enhances this effect by delivering triethylene glycol, a compound that has been shown to promote sleep induction.

Additionally, Relaxium Sleep's formula incorporates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter present in the brain that reduces neural and central nervous system (CNS) activity. GABA essentially enables the brain and CNS to deactivate when necessary, making it a valuable ingredient for promoting sleep, decreasing both physical and mental stress, alleviating anxiety, and inducing a sense of calm.

Moreover, Relaxium Sleep contains an assortment of botanicals aimed at encouraging sleep, elevating mood, and mitigating insomnia.

Problematic Research Methodology

The evidence surrounding Relaxium's effectiveness presents a dichotomy, with certain aspects raising concerns, while others lend credibility to its claims.

The manufacturer, American Behavioral Research Institute, asserts that Relaxium has been clinically proven to work. However, the term "clinically proven" typically implies third-party testing and publication in a reputable, peer-reviewed medical journal for quality and bias assessment. In this case, Relaxium's evidence stems from an unpublished study, available only as a PDF on their website, which is insufficient for establishing scientific validity.

On the other hand, although the entire formula hasn't undergone rigorous testing, individual ingredients have been extensively studied. For example, magnesium is well-established for its sleep-enhancing effects. Nonetheless, Relaxium contains suboptimal forms of magnesium, such as magnesium oxide and magnesium citrate, rather than the more readily absorbed magnesium malate.

Relaxium's botanical blend, Valerest, has demonstrated limited efficacy, with a study revealing no improvement in sleep quality. Conversely, ashwagandha, present at 125 mg, has shown potential in enhancing sleep. Similarly, GABA has proven sleep benefits, albeit at a dosage on the lower end of the effective range.

The formula's chamomile content is underdosed compared to the typical 400 mg, which has demonstrated sleep benefits. Melatonin, however, is included at an effective dose of 5 mg, making it a valuable component of the formula. Despite some ingredients being underdosed, the combination of these components may still result in an effective sleep aid.

NooCube Sleep Upgrade - Best Overall For Sleep - Check Deals

Ingredients In Detail

The formulation of Relaxium Sleep relies on a selection of well-researched, high-quality ingredients designed to enhance sleep initiation and the overall sleep cycle.

The inclusion of magnesium is a strategic decision, as it addresses the prevalent issue of magnesium deficiency. Although magnesium itself does not directly improve sleep, deficiencies have been linked to stress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Optimizing magnesium intake may help alleviate these symptoms. While the 100mg of magnesium in each Relaxium serving is not the most bioavailable form, it serves as a valuable supplement to a balanced diet.

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an amino acid and neurotransmitter, stands out as a key component of Relaxium Sleep. GABA facilitates communication between brain cells and has been demonstrated to improve sleep quality, partly by reducing stress levels. Additionally, GABA can enhance mood, alertness, and energy levels, providing a bonus alongside improved sleep.

L-tryptophan, another amino acid present in Relaxium Sleep, is converted by the body into melatonin and serotonin, promoting faster sleep onset and mood enhancement.

The supplement also incorporates a variety of botanical ingredients, such as the proprietary blend Valerest, known for improving sleep quality and accelerating sleep onset. Valerest has a long history in traditional medicine for addressing insomnia and anxiety.

Each Relaxium serving contains 125mg of ashwagandha, a popular supplement ingredient renowned for reducing anxiety, promoting relaxation, and enhancing sleep quality.

Chamomile and passionflower, commonly found in sleep aids, are also present in Relaxium Sleep. Chamomile, utilized for centuries to treat insomnia and improve sleep quality, shows potential for addressing nightmares, night terrors, and night sweats. Although slightly underdosed at 75mg per serving, it complements the other ingredients in the formula. Passionflower shares a similar reputation and is theorized to increase GABA levels naturally.

Lastly, Relaxium Sleep includes a direct dose of melatonin, the body's sleep hormone, produced in the pineal gland to regulate the sleep cycle. By providing an external source of melatonin, Relaxium aims to promote faster, deeper sleep quality.

Potential Side Effects of Relaxium Sleep

There is a possibility of experiencing several side effects, primarily originating from the presence of GABA and melatonin within the supplement. These side effects may include pronounced drowsiness and lethargy, difficulties in awakening, and instances of dizziness and nausea, which could subsequently result in impaired coordination.


Some users have also reported muscular weakness and gastrointestinal disturbances, which are likely attributable to the ashwagandha content.

Despite the potential for these adverse effects, it is important to note that they are generally of mild intensity and occur relatively infrequently.

Problems Experienced with Relaxium Sleep

  • Drowsiness and lethargy
  • Difficulties in awakening
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Impaired coordination

Test

Result

Sleep

8

Cognition

7

Memory

7

Mood

6

Stress

6

Brain Health

8

Learning

7

Overall

7

Pros and Cons

Pros

Well rounded ingredient profile

Inclusion of phosphatidylserine, recognized by FDA as effective at boosting cognition

Cons

Unproven claims

Inclusion of ingredients not recognized for their claimed effects on cognitive performance

Conclusion

Relaxium Sleep, while not completely flawed, also falls short of being a truly compelling sleep aid. Although the product's manufacturers claim that Relaxium has been clinically proven to work, the evidence for this is weak at best. The research cited by the company is questionable and lacking in rigorous scientific validation.

Moreover, while the ingredients included in the formula are logical choices for a sleep supplement, there are other products on the market that offer a more well-rounded ingredient profile, and are likely to be more effective for most people seeking to improve their sleep.

While Relaxium Sleep is relatively affordable compared to some other sleep supplements, there are cheaper options available that provide more comprehensive formulas and may offer greater efficacy.

It is worth noting that trust is an important factor when selecting a supplement, especially one that is intended to be taken regularly and may impact your health and well-being. In this regard, the lack of scientific validation for Relaxium's claims may be cause for concern, and consumers should exercise caution when considering this product.


All of those shortcomings lead us to recommend users to consider NooCube Sleep Upgrade as a more comprehensive and more trustworthy alternative for people looking to improve the quality and consistency of their sleep.

Best Alternative To Relaxium Sleep

The main research behind Relaxium Sleep has some serious flaws and isn't robust. On top of that, many of the ingredients are not present in the right amounts to be clinically effective. However, the product performs adequately for some people.

With that said, we recommend NooCube Sleep Upgrade instead. It has a simple yet powerful mix of natural ingredients like magnesium, vitamin D3, and soothing plant extracts. These ingredients help your body naturally produce melatonin, and our own tests have shown it to yield better and more consistent results than Relaxium.

The ingredients in NooCube Sleep Upgrade are superior to those in Relaxium Sleep and it's a simpler, more effective natural formula. The key components in NooCube, such as magnesium, vitamin D3, and calming plant extracts, have a well-established role in promoting restful sleep. They work by enhancing the body's natural production of melatonin, the hormone responsible for sleep regulation.

Relaxium vs NooCube Sleep Upgrade Review

References

Magnesium: Tarleton, E.K., Littenberg, B., MacLean, C.D., Kennedy, A.G., & Daley, C. (2015). Role of magnesium supplementation in the treatment of depression: A randomized clinical trial. PLOS One, 10(4), e0125551.

Melatonin: Andersen, L.P., Gögenur, I., Rosenberg, J., & Reiter, R.J. (2016). The safety of melatonin in humans. Clinical Drug Investigation, 36(3), 169-175.

GABA: Abdou, A.M., Higashiguchi, S., Horie, K., Kim, M., Hatta, H., & Yokogoshi, H. (2006). Relaxation and immunity enhancement effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration in humans. BioFactors, 26(3), 201-208.

Ashwagandha: Singh, N., Bhalla, M., de Jager, P., & Gilca, M. (2011). An overview on ashwagandha: A Rasayana (rejuvenator) of Ayurveda. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary, and Alternative Medicines, 8(5 Suppl), 208-213.

Chamomile: Amsterdam, J.D., Li, Y., Soeller, I., Rockwell, K., & Mao, J.J. (2009). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral Matricaria recutita (chamomile) extract therapy for generalized anxiety disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 29(4), 378-382.

Passionflower: Ngan, A., & Conduit, R. (2011). A double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation of the effects of Passiflora incarnata (passionflower) herbal tea on subjective sleep quality. Phytotherapy Research, 25(8), 1153-1159.
L-tryptophan: Hartmann, E. (1982). Effects of L-tryptophan on sleepiness and on sleep. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 17(2), 107-113.

Phosphatidylserine: Hellhammer, J., Fries, E., Buss, C., Engert, V., Tuch, A., & Rutenberg, D. (2004). Effects of soy lecithin phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine complex (PAS) on the endocrine and psychological responses to mental stress. Stress, 7(2), 119-126.

Citicoline: McGlade, E., Agoston, A.M., DiMuzio, J., Kizaki, M., Nakazaki, E., & Kamiya, T. (2015). The effect of citicoline supplementation on motor speed and attention in adolescent males. Journal of Attention Disorders, 19(5), 425-438.

Lion’s mane mushroom: Mori, K., Inatomi, S., Ouchi, K., Azumi, Y., & Tuchida, T. (2009). Improving effects of the mushroom Yamabushitake (Hericium erinaceus) on mild cognitive impairment: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Phytotherapy Research, 23(3), 367-372.

Miodownik, C., Lerner, V., Kovalyonok, E., & Dwolatzky, T. (2015). Effect of Ashwagandha on cognitive function in Alzheimer’s disease. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 30(2), 131-138. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.4244

Rondanelli, M., Opizzi, A., Faliva, M., Bucci, M., Perna, S., & Riva, A. (2019). Effects of a diet integration with an oily emulsion of DHA-phospholipids containing melatonin and tryptophan in elderly patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment. Nutrients, 11(3), 509. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030509

Sánchez-Barceló, E. J., Mediavilla, M. D., & Reiter, R. J. (2011). Clinical uses of melatonin: evaluation of human trials. Current Medicinal Chemistry, 18(27), 4285-4312. https://doi.org/10.2174/092986711797535099

Sarris, J., Byrne, G. J., Cribb, L., Oliver, G., Murphy, J., Macdonald, P., ... & Savage, K. M. (2019). L-theanine in the adjunctive treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 111, 74-81. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.01.013

Shafiee, M., Arekhi, S., Omranzadeh, A., Sahebkar, A., & Emami, S. A. (2016). Magnesium supplementation and sleep quality in the elderly: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, 38, 116-122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2016.06.005


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